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Please join us for the 2015 ChBE Homecoming Tailgate! Reconnect with fellow alumni and meet faculty and students. Enjoy food and drinks before the game. Cheer on the Fighting Illini as they take on the Wisconsin Badgers.
The Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering is pleased to present the Fall 2015 International Paper Company Lecture Series.
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Professor Bill Hammack, a.k.a. "The Engineer Guy," celebrates "the stunning engineering that gave life to movies" in his latest video.
Congratulations to Professor Ken Schweizer, recipient of the Joel Henry Hildebrand Award in the Theoretical and Experimental Chemistry of Liquids from the American Chemical Society.
"Girls Rock!" "Yes we do!" Before their morning lecture and again in the afternoon before they make catalysts, a group of high school girls respond to the traditional call-out for participants in the GAMES (Girls’ Adventures in Mathematics, Engineering and Science) Camp.
Read the fascinating story of one of our alumni, Joseph Sant'Angelo, Class of 1954. This article appeared in the Spring/Summer issue of Mass Transfer, our alumni and friends newsletter.
Searching a whole genome for one particular sequence is like trying to fish a specific piece from the box of a billion-piece puzzle. Using advanced imaging techniques, University of Illinois researchers have observed how one set of genome-editing proteins finds its specific targets, which could help them design better gene therapies to treat disease.
Some students have landed jobs with leading energy companies. Others will join international food and beverage companies. A number of other students will head to graduate schools this fall.
The University of Illinois Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering this week welcomed back Walt Robb, who received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering under Harry Drickamer in 1951.
New research from the University of Illinois holds promise for the treatment of vascular diseases, but it also has drawn some unexpected attention from a community of scientists who may not typically follow the latest developments in biomedicine.